c4000 BC – 43 AD

One of Walsham’s early occupants, a pre-historic person, knapping flints to make primitive tools.Walsham le Willows is a rectangular parish with a stream running down the centre. To the west the soils are predominantly gravel – to the east mainly clay. This has influenced the pattern of settlement.

The first signs of human occupation occur in the Mesolithic period (c6000BC), the hunter/fisher people.

Photograph of waste flakes of flint left over from flint-knapping which were found all over the parish.
Evidence – a thin scatter of flint tools.

Waste flakes from pre-historic flint-knapping were found all over the parish – but the largest numbers were in the West Street area. 

 

 

 

An axe-head found at Willow Tree Farm. It has been damaged by ploughing and from being buried in the soil for so long.

With the arrival of agriculture in the Neolithic period (c4000–2000BC), the lighter soils were more easily managed by primitive implements. This axe-head was found at Willow Tree Farm amongst a large number of flint tools and flakes were found – but no actual settlement.

An axe-head found at Willow Tree Farm. It has been damaged by ploughing and from being buried in the soil for so long.The axe-heads would have been fixed into a handle like this reconstruction.

 

 

 

Drawing of part of a bronze harness ornament found near Old Hall dated c.400-440BC.A single stray bronze harness ornament found near Old Hall represents the Iron Age (c400 – 440 BC)

 

 

 

Map of Walsham, titled “Walsham le Willows 4000 – 42 BC”, showing where four flint axe-heads were found (of which there are about seven sites) plus the sites of large quantities of waste flints in the West Street area (again around seven sites). “Ixworth Road”, “West Street”, “Summer Road”, “Four Ashes”, “Wattisfield Road”, “Crownland”, “Cranmer Green”, “Finningham Road”, “Allwood Green”.